Koalas Are Dying Of Thirst, So This Farmer Decided To Do Something About It

Homepage featured Other animal lovers Australian Wildlife blinky drinkers 20th of March 2017

Pictures of koalas drinking water have been released all over the Internet, and even though it looks cute, actually, it’s a really bad sign. Koalas, one of the symbols of the Australian wildlife, normally get the hydration they need from the eucalyptus leaves they eat. However, due to draughts and wildfires caused by climate change, their food supplies dried out, which resulted in many koalas becoming thirsty and turning to water.


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That’s why Robert Frend, a simple farmer from New South Wales, Australia, decided to do something about the issue. He made an invention called ‘Blinky Drinkers’. It’s a water station that attaches to trees and gives thirsty koalas access to the water. “If I can help, well I get a certain amount of enjoyment out of that… they’re a lovely species,” says Frend.

Frend partnered with researchers at the University of Sydney to gain deeper insight into koala drinking patterns now that they are so affected by global warming. Sadly, there are only 43,000 koalas left in the wild today.

More info: The University Of Syndey (h/t)

Although a picture of a koala drinking water looks cute, it’s actually a bad sign

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Koalas normally get the hydration they need from the eucalyptus leaves

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Image credits: Kate Wilson

However, due to draughts and wildfires caused by climate change, their food supplies dried out

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Image credits: Caroline Marschner

A farmer named Robert Frend decided to do something about it and created ‘Blinky Drinkers’

It’s a water station that attaches to trees and gives thirsty koalas access to the water. Watch the video:

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